Our Team

Meet the staff members who make it all happen.

Eliza Baker-Wacks

Fruit and Vegetable Production Manager & Educator
Read More →

Lia Bensley

Marketing & Communications Manager
Read More →

Susan Connolly

Director of Finance & Administration
Read More →

Dorn Cox

Research Director
Read More →

Molly Cyr

Farm Camps Manager
Read More →

Chuck DeGrandpre

Facilities Projects Manager
Read More →

Jim DeGrandpre

Director of Visitor Services
Read More →

Laura Demmel Gilmer

OpenTEAM Global Coordinator and Community Facilitator
Read More →

Ben Gotschall

Dairy Manager
Read More →

Joe Grady

Deputy Director/Senior Director of Programs
Read More →

Dave Herring

Executive Director
Read More →

Andrew Lombardi

Events & Public Programs Manager
Read More →

Marissa Mastors

Grants & Development Manager
Read More →

Jeannie Mattson

Director of Development & Community Engagement
Read More →

Michael Messina

Education Programs Assistant
Read More →

Thomas Prohl

Farm Operations and Systems Manager
Read More →

Leah Puro

Agricultural Research Coordinator
Read More →

Eliza Baker-Wacks

Fruit and Vegetable Production Manager & Educator
Growing up in Los Angeles, I was so lucky to have access to local food all year round and parents who loved trying new things in the garden and on our plates. After graduating from Colby College with a major in Environmental Studies, I headed to Hawaii and worked on a human-powered two-acre organic vegetable farm, where my passion for farming was born! I loved spending long days in the sun and eating crunchy produce straight from the fields. I also enjoyed the constant brainstorming and problem solving that went with it. I returned to Maine in 2019 and began working as an apprentice at Wolfe’s Neck Center. I immediately fell in love with the seasonal nature of farming in Maine. When I’m not covered in soil here at the farm, you can find me hiking Maine’s mountains, swimming in the ocean, and baking tasty treats!

Lia Bensley

Marketing & Communications Manager

I grew up in Pennsylvania, graduated with a B.S. in Business Management from Rochester Institute of Technology, and lived throughout New England before settling in southern Maine. I am the proud daughter of a music teacher and married into a family of sailors, gardeners, and hobby farmers. My love of nature was developed throughout childhood and has grown exponentially since moving to Maine in 2014.

It has always been my great aspiration to synthesize so much of what I value – non-profit work, education, agriculture, the environment, great design, and transparent communication – into a career. I love using my skillset to share the story of the Center’s impressive heritage while looking to its exciting future.

My husband and I live on our own mini version of Wolfe’s Neck Center in Kittery, ME on six acres of waterfront, forest, and gardens. We live with our rescue pit bull, two cats, and 12 chickens, and are looking forward to adding two goats in the spring.

lbensley@wolfesneck.org

Susan Connolly

Director of Finance & Administration

After 20 years in the land conservation realm and being an integral part of a growing organization supporting operations to do this amazing work along the coast of Maine, I had the opportunity to step away and explore new personal challenges.  I found the new position as the Finance & Administration Manager at Wolfe’s Neck Farm in 2016 an ideal opportunity for me to bring my experience and passion for effective organizational development to the growth and transformation currently happening here.  It is a joy to come to work every day to a beautiful location and work with a great group of people who are honoring the past and looking innovatively to the future in all diverse areas of operations here at Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment.

I have oversight of the financial management of organizational operations and seek opportunities to support all staff in creating systems to work most effectively in support of a growing and dynamic organization.

When I am not working, I spend as much time as I can outdoors enjoying Maine with my family and friends.

sconnolly@wolfesneck.org

Dorn Cox

Research Director

In addition to his work at Wolfe’s Neck Center, Dorn is a farmer working his 250-acre certified organic family farm in New Hampshire. As a founder of the FarmOS software platform and the Farm Hack community, he is passionate about sharing open source agricultural tools, software and data to accelerate innovation and quantify environmental services from regenerative agriculture. He has a PhD from the University of New Hampshire in Natural Resources and Earth Systems Science.

dcox@wolfesneck.org 

Molly Cyr

Farm Camps Manager

Growing up, my summers were spent on the coast of Maine at camp, where my passion for the outdoors and experiential learning blossomed. Leadership development was an essential part of life at camp and inspired me to attend Sterling College where I earned my degree in Outdoor Education & Leadership in spring of 2012.

Since then, I have had several opportunities to work in settings connecting kids with the outdoors and managing summer camp programs. Most recently I worked with the YMCA organization, managing their fundraising and grant writing efforts, and sharing stories about the importance of creating healthy lifestyles. After 4 years with the Y, it was time to find a place where I could refocus on youth and create wonderful opportunities to engage them in the natural environment.

Here at Wolfe’s Neck Center, I will be overseeing and managing the Farm Camp Programs, expanding existing offerings, and creating new programs to support our mission. I will also work to build collaborative partnerships within the organization and the local community. I am excited to encourage a strong staff in educating kids on a working farm, in agricultural gardens and exploring nature trails, marshes and the local ecosystem!

I love being outside, exploring new places along the coast and in the mountains; SUP paddling, surf skiing, canoeing, whitewater paddling, camping, hiking, biking, Nordic skiing, and anything else Maine has to offer.

mcyr@wolfesneck.org

Chuck DeGrandpre

Facilities Projects Manager

I consider myself very fortunate to have grown up on dairy farms in Massachusetts prior to the Smith family recruiting my dad to come to Wolfe’s Neck Farm.  His passion for organic farming and sustainable agriculture were a perfect fit for the farm. My most formative years were spent working and learning while receiving many life lessons on Wolfe’s Neck.

The next forty years passed in a heartbeat between college, advanced vocation education while in the optical and laser technology industries. My fire service career began as a Firefighter/EMT in Lebanon, NH then in Portland, ME and finally as Fire Chief in Freeport, ME. My interest in Firefighter Health and Safety brought me to On Target Challenge, as project manger, where my team developed, marketed and facilitated physical fitness based competitions within the fire service community throughout the United States and several countries around the world.

For the past six years I’ve worked at Wolfe’s Neck Farm, now Wolfe’s Neck Center, assisting with facility upgrades, new building projects and ongoing care and maintenance of existing properties. I am excited to join the Wolfe’s Neck Center team on a permanent basis and look forward to our future growth as a leader in agriculture and the environment.

cdegrandpre@wolfesneck.org

Jim DeGrandpre

Director of Visitor Services
Jim arrived at Wolfe’s Neck Center over five decades ago. In October 1968, Mr. and Mrs. L.M.C. Smith invited Jim’s father, Charlie DeGrandpre to come to Maine to join them in developing their visionary organic beef farm, with a focus toward educating and demonstrating organic principles, and providing quality organic beef to a national audience Jim’s family even lived in the Little River Farmhouse, which now houses our admin offices and serves as the hub for educational programs!
These days, Jim serves as our charismatic Director of Visitor Services and helps to welcome thousands of guests to the farm every year. Jim’s expertise, historical knowledge, and passion for Wolfe’s Neck Center are an integral part of our daily operations.

Laura Demmel Gilmer

OpenTEAM Global Coordinator and Community Facilitator

I grew up on a farm in Nebraska and have always had a passion for sustainable agriculture with my first enterprise being pastured chickens and sweet corn sales. My interest in scaling soil health practices nationally and internationally through systemic changes has brought me to WNC.

I coordinate the global community for the Open Technology Ecosystem for Agriculture Management (OpenTEAM) initiative, bringing together stakeholders across the agricultural value chain to facilitate a community and technological platform to support farmers in improving soil health.  This open, collaborative community will help facilitate points of connection for farmers to better access agricultural data insights, ecosystem markets, and other conservation incentives, regardless of geography, production system or farm scale.

In my free time, I enjoy being active outside and bringing people together through a home cooked meal.

laura@openteam.community

Ben Gotschall

Dairy Manager

I was born and raised on a ranch in the Sandhills of southwest Holt County, Nebraska, where we raised beef cattle, dairy cattle and bison. I obtained an MFA in poetry, which enabled me to publish a full-length collection of poems and work as a college professor for several years teaching writing and literature before returning to agriculture full-time.

In addition to owning and managing several organic dairy, micro-dairy and creamery businesses, I have previously worked in ag policy, grassroots environmental organizing, and local food cooperative distribution. Along with my wife Tammy and our daughter Charlotte, we also operate Holt Creek Jerseys, a grass-fed dairy cattle and genetics business that I began when I was 10 years old.

Life-long learning is important to me and I look forward to helping others make the Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship program at Wolfe’s Neck the best it can be.  I believe that by working with nature, utilizing research, and enabling innovation, members of the dairy team here can become leaders in the exciting future of regenerative food production.

bgotschall@wolfesneck.org

Joe Grady

Deputy Director/Senior Director of Programs

I grew up in the suburbs around Detroit but was lucky enough to move to Maine when I was 15. Since that big move I have grown increasingly connected to all this beautiful state has to offer. In my teens and twenties that meant getting out to surf and snowboard every chance I got; sailing, hiking, and camping also played a big role in what I did as a young adult. Fast forward through 4 years of college and a 6 month trip through Europe and South Asia and my wife and I returned to Maine to start our family and build our life.

A teacher by training, I count myself fortunate to have worked with so many amazing educators in Maine and New Hampshire. I loved teaching and never felt more at home then leading a classroom of high schoolers. My career eventually took me to a school that was also a farm and was using that farm as a tool to teach about the importance of what we eat and how it’s raised. At that school a passion for agriculture was kindled in me and would change my life.

Eventually I left teaching to start a small farm business with my wife Laura. In 2009 we created Two Coves Farm in Harpswell and have been there ever since. We are proud of what we have built and plan to continue raising meat and eggs on Harpswell and Brunswick pastures for years to come. On our farm, if I’m not out moving cows or chicken tractors around, you’re likely to find me training or working with our herding dogs.

I feel so fortunate to have found at WNC an organization so close to home that has such an inspiring and important mission.

jgrady@wolfesneck.org

Dave Herring

Executive Director

I was immediately captivated by the beauty and the potential of this place to play a more meaningful role in the community and in securing a more sustainable future for farming and food.  The opportunity to lead the organization towards a renewed focus and vision was one that really excited me then (in 2012, when I took the job) and even more so today.

I work every day to provide the leadership and vision necessary to move the organization forward or, according to my daughters, I shovel poop.

When I’m not at Wolfe’s Neck I like to play outside as much as possible exploring Maine’s natural beauty and spending time with my wife and two young daughters.

dherring@wolfesneck.org

Andrew Lombardi

Events & Public Programs Manager

While I originally grew up in New England, I recently returned after a five year hiatus of living in the Northwest. Before joining Wolfe’s Neck Center, my career has varied from teaching secondary education, to marine ecology in coastal Maine, and leading tours and demonstrations on a farm. Most recently I was able to be a part of the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, where I was involved in all of the amazing public programs on and off zoo grounds.

Now that I’ve moved back, I couldn’t be more excited to bring my experiences to WNC. Our public programs give visitors and families a chance to deepen their connection with this magical place, and to be part of that is pretty special.

When not here, I am generally running through the woods somewhere, attempting to be a chef, and trying to spend as much time outside as possible.

alombardi@wolfesneck.org

Marissa Mastors

Grants & Development Manager

Originally from north of Boston, I “discovered” farming after volunteering on a farm in 2009, and never looked back.  My educational and professional journey since then has cultivated a deep passion for helping others experience that sense of wonder I discovered years ago through getting my hands dirty.  I feel grateful every day that I can help move the important mission of Wolfe’s Neck Center forward.  I hold a B.A. from Skidmore College, an M.S. in Leadership for Sustainability Education from Portland State University, and two Permaculture Design Certificates from Israel and Oregon.

When I’m not working, you can usually find me in my garden or exploring the Maine wilderness, spending time outdoors with my husband and daughter.

mmastors@wolfesneck.org

Jeannie Mattson

Director of Development & Community Engagement

I grew up on an island in Maine digging in clam flats, climbing rocks and exploring the coastal woods around my house so Wolfe’s Neck feels a lot like home to me. I was educated in Maine for the most part, leaving briefly for graduate school and happily returning to live and work in our beautiful state. Most of my professional life has centered around politics and public policy where I focused on issues of conservation, environmental health and early childcare and education. Connecting people to agriculture and Maine’s coastal environment through festivals, farm to table dinners and celebrations at the farm is a wonderful way to highlight this amazing resource. My family and I are fortunate to be neighbors of the farm and live in this incredible area, and I am so happy to be part of the Wolfe’s Neck Center team.

jmattson@wolfesneck.org

Michael Messina

Education Programs Assistant

I had a somewhat indoorsy childhood in the near-Chicago suburbs; my first camping trip was a weeklong backpacking trip as a part of my college orientation. I’ve been trying to get back outside ever since, whether it has been for class, work, or play. I graduated from Calvin College in Michigan, double majoring in Environmental Studies and Philosophy, and have been moving from place to place ever since. I have taught basic mountain ecology to the public as a naturalist in Colorado, patrolled campsites as a Recreation Ranger for the Bureau of Land management in eastern Oregon, introduced middle schoolers to the outdoors as a 4H instructor in Bryant Pond, and taught toddlers how to ski at Sunday River before coming to Wolfe’s Neck in Spring of 2019 as a Community and Visitor Programs educator. Now my itinerant days are behind me as I look forward to hunkering down and taking root as the Education Programs Assistant here at Wolfe’s Neck.

When I’m not at Wolfe’s Neck, you can find me birdwatching, climbing fake rocks at the climbing gym, hiking, skiing, or complaining about Chicago sports teams.

mmessina@wolfesneck.org

Thomas Prohl

Farm Operations and Systems Manager

My passion for farming began after spending summers working at Spring Ledge Farm in my hometown of New London, NH. After completing my B.S. in Sustainable Agriculture and Food systems from the University of New Hampshire, I spent time in Latin America immersing myself in food and culture while volunteering for nonprofits and working at research farms. I returned to the Northeast and found a home here at Wolfe’s Neck Center.

I train future organic farmers at Wolfe’s Neck Center, and am passionate about addressing food security, wellbeing, and education in our community.

When not working, I can be found feeding my rabbit Brenda bananas and hiking, camping, or paddling in Maine’s mountains and waterways.

tprohl@wolfesneck.org

Leah Puro

Agricultural Research Coordinator

My farming journey began on a diversified vegetable farm in the mountains of Northern Argentina and led me to farms in South Carolina, Vermont, and the Hudson Valley. Captivated by plants and soils, I went back to school for a Masters in Science in International Agricultural Development from the University of California Davis. As a graduate student researcher, I conducted research in Vietnam and Cambodia with the International Center for Tropical Agriculture and in California with the University of California Cooperative Extension. My agricultural experiences have ranged from collecting soils in Vietnam to crop rotation planning to trimming the hooves of 200 sheep and lots in between.

At Wolfe’s Neck, I coordinate our on-farm research trials, work with OpenTEAM as a farm hub, and translate our exciting research into programming.

When I’m not at Wolfe’s Neck, you can find me running and exploring the woods or covered in flour experimenting with sourdough bread.

lpuro@wolfesneck.org

Wolfe’s Neck Center is fortunate to have a talented
Board of Directors.

They are well-versed in education, agriculture, business, marketing, and personnel. They are some of WNC’s strongest allies and they help keep us working toward our mission.

David Bennell

Read More →

Peter Bouman

Read More →

Morgan Cuthbert

Secretary
Read More →

Tim Griffin

Vice Chair
Read More →

Gray Harris

Read More →

Megan Hellstedt

Read More →

Triplett Kise

Read More →

Tucker Lannon

Raina Maxwell

Treasurer
Read More →

Vivi Stevenson Miller

Read More →

Brett Pierce

Read More →

Lee Schepps

Chair
Read More →

Sam Smith

Read More →

Meredeth Winter

Read More →

David Bennell

David Bennell is the North American lead for Food and Nature at the World Business Council for Sustainable Development where he focuses on sustainable agriculture, natural climate solutions, and global food systems reform. Previously, he was Director of Food and Capital Markets for the investor network Ceres.

He’s worked for Microsoft, REI and LL Bean in leadership development, product development and sourcing positions. His career also includes working as a funder focused on sustainable forestry, the co-creation of the for-profit social enterprise company CottonConnect, co-creation of an impact investing fund focused on food and agriculture investments and leading the apparel industry NGO Textile Exchange focused on standards development for responsible sourcing of materials.

David created the world’s most-watched sustainability series Sustainability Strategies hosted on Linked In Learning and previously held a five-year adjunct faculty position at MIT where he taught sustainable design and development.

Peter Bouman

Physician

How did you first become connected with WNC?  I am a neighbor.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?  I will contribute to WNC’s mission in any way I can.

What is your favorite thing about WNC?  The trails.  They are full of lady slippers in the spring!

Morgan Cuthbert

Secretary

Name: Morgan C Cuthbert

Occupation/Title:  Educator, Yarmouth School System

How did you first become connected with WNC?

I grew up in Brunswick and remember my family coming to the farm as a child to see the animals. I now have my own family and have settled in Freeport with my two boys and wife, Christina. We very much enjoy all the farm offers since the transformation that has taken place over the last 30 years. The camps, the dinners, and all the workings of a saltwater farm allow for a connection to nature and a direct link to understanding where our food comes from.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?

I always had a love for science and the workings of the world around us. As a science educator of over 15 years I encourage students to use the inquiry process and become aware citizens. I cannot think of a better location then WNC to be a base for these methods. Place-based learning and authentic science bring community and education together where students end by understanding and not memorizing content. My hope is that I can help to develop more experiences like this at WNC. Further, I hope to share the amazing science that is going on at WNC with other educational professionals and institutions.  

What is your favorite thing about WNC?

My favorite thing about Wolfe’s Neck Center is the part it provides within our community. WNC is an establishment that links our busy lives with nature and allows a center for people to come together to experience growth and life. Whether it is driving out to see the baby lambs, dropping my kids off at a Summer Camp or taking a Sunday evening to see friends and celebrate the local food WNC provides at a Farm Dinner driving down the road to WNC I decompress and I think my blood pressure drops.  

Tim Griffin

Vice Chair

Associate Professor and Program Director – Agriculture Food and Environment

Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston MA

How did you first become connected with WNC? My first university faculty position, starting in 1992 (until 2000) was at the University of Maine.  My expertise includes grazing management, and I visited WNC during my first week of work.  I have been involved, off and on, since that time.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?  My recent and current work focuses on the food system, from production to nutrition and health.  I want to help WNC become a central and important research center that links all of these areas.

What is your favorite thing about WNC?  Two things: just being there.  And that our kids grew up coming to the farm and still talk about it (and visit).

Gray Harris

Senior Program Director, Food Systems & Natural Resources

How did you first become connected with WNC? I visited with my girls when they were young, but it was when I got to know current board President, Fiona Wilson, when I was introduced to all the exciting developments happening on the farm, and was invited to sit on the board.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board? I love strategic planning that leads to action on the ground, and WNC has plenty of that going on!  In particular, I hope to assist in building out the organic dairy program to be a premier national training site for the next generation of organic dairy farms in Maine and the northeast.

What is your favorite thing about WNC? The extraordinary energy embodied by the staff and the board to make things happen and move things along.  The work of building a robust, resilient and regenerative food system is tough, and the work of the long game.  It’s a privilege to work with such intelligent and thoughtful leaders dedicated to making that goal a reality.

Megan Hellstedt

How did you first become connected with WNC?

After knowing about the farm from living in the area in the early 2000’s, I was reacquainted with WNC’s work in 2019.  Dave Herring presented the Center’s programs and how sustainable agriculture could be a tool to fight climate change to a group from my work.  I was instantly sold on the mission, and then became gradually more involved as my kids experienced farm camp and my family began to explore more of the great programming that the Center offers.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?

I’m very committed to finding solutions that address climate change and healthier eating at the same time.  With my background in sustainability of food retail, training in environmental science, and time spent working on land conservation, I’m excited to contribute to the long-term strategic planning for WNC. They are fast becoming established as a research center and testing ground for a healthier food future, and I can’t wait to see that extend in its scope and impact.

What is your favorite thing about WNC?

The diversity of the Center is so rich, from teaching young farmers and kids about raising and eating good food, to actually raising a diverse set of crops and experimenting with how to do it better, to driving creation of innovative tools so farmers can play a role in reversing climate change… That is my favorite thing: the energizing ecosystem WNC has built that connects people, good food, and a better future for the planet.

Triplett Kise

Woodworker

How did you first become connected with WNC? I’ve been connected my whole life beginning with the summers I spent here as a child when it was still my grandparent’s farm and summer residence.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board? I moved to Maine in 2010 largely because I wanted to be here in order to help the farm in as many ways as possible. I have always been an advocate for environmentally conscious agricultural practices and my youth, enthusiasm, knowledge of the property and its history, and connection to the neighborhood are all beneficial personal qualities for the organization.

What is your favorite thing about WNC? My favorite thing about Wolfe’s Neck Center is the beauty of its coastal farm landscape that has remained relatively unchanged for over two hundred years and continues to be actively farmed.

Raina Maxwell

Treasurer

Raina is Vice President, Customer Satisfaction at L.L.Bean.  She is a graduate of the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Virginia.

Vivi Stevenson Miller

Large Animal Rescue (welfare & emergency) & Grant Seeker/Proposal Writer for NGOs- Self employed. Also volunteer with Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue and The American Red Cross. 

How did you first become connected with WNC? I’ve been coming to the Farm since I was a baby.  I’ve spent every summer of my life on the Farm, going with my Grandfather, as a child, to check the cattle or the hay; learning about forage & soil quality, as a teen,  from Charlie DeGrandpre; exploring the woods and learning about native plants & medicinals from my Grandmother.   

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?  Education, conservation, history and alternative farming practices are all in my DNA, and are all areas I have been very involved in while living on our farm in Tennessee as well as during my summers on Wolfe’s Neck.  As my husband and I transition from our lives in Tennessee to Maine, I plan to be even more active in the continued success of my Grandparent’s experiment with organics and other alternative methods on their historic  saltwater farm.


What is your favorite thing about WNC?  That it not only continues to be relevant, but is now becoming a leader in education and research into alternative agricultural methods and how those methods better our environment- locally, regionally, nationally and globally.  AND… that it does all this while still honoring the legacy of Wolfe’s Neck Farm as it was and as it grew to become Wolfe’s Neck Center. 

Brett Pierce

Executive Director, Meridian Stories

How did you first become connected with WNC? I moved into the neighborhood and my kids both went to camp there. My son eventually became a junior and then a full counselor, in addition to other positions that broadly shaped his interests, character and values.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board? My passion and expertise lie in progressive educational development. My background is in media program development around educational goals, as well as in classroom teaching. At WNC, there are many utterly unique opportunities for both formal and informal learning and I hope to be a part of the shaping of those opportunities, to make WNC an exciting and extraordinary educational environment.

What is your favorite thing about WNC? The beauty. The trails. The peace of the cows. The stray cat. The estuary. The vista. And again, the trails.

Lee Schepps

Chair

Retired from a career in law and business. 

How did you first become connected with WNC?  After retirement, we moved to Freeport, near Wolfe’s Neck Center.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?  We are supporting WNC financially and by way of my legal and business skills.

What is your favorite thing about WNC?  The regenerative farming initiative is very exciting and promises to put WNC among the leaders of this potentially global endeavor. Plus, WNC is a gorgeous, wholesome and altogether inviting place for our local Maine community.

Sam Smith

Sam is a journalist and author of four books

How did you first become connected with WNC?  As a youth when my parents started the farm. Was driving a tractor and a six-wheel Army surplus truck when I was a young teen

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board?  Experience, ideas, enthusiasm

What is your favorite thing about WNC?  Being so involved with nature with such a wonderful operation and a great staff

Meredeth Winter

Senior Development Program Advisor at The Nature Conservancy

How did you first become connected with WNC? As is the case for many lucky people, I first got to know Wolfe’s Neck Center through farm visits with my children. Between the engaging animals, the opportunities to get hands dirty chaperoning school trips, the fall and spring festivals, touch football on the Wedding Field, and the stunning views, there’s a lot of incentive to keep coming back. I volunteered at a couple of the festivals and that was my entrée to deeper involvement.

How do you hope to best contribute to WNC’s development through your tenure on the Board? Over the past several years I’ve had the benefit of watching WNC build a vision for the future – both the farm’s future and the future of our region’s farms and food systems. It has been tremendously exciting to see WNC build on the remarkable foundation laid by the Smith Family in founding the organization, with an eye to delivering impact locally, regionally, and now, even globally. I hope to help WNC and its many supporters ensure that we are able to deliver on that vision through strong programs and sustainable funding.

What is your favorite thing about WNC? There are the smart and dedicated people behind the vision and the programs. There are the charismatic animals populating the barns and fields. There are the fabulous campsites nestled along the bays. There are the historic buildings now finding new life and renewed purpose. And there’s the amazing mix of woods, fields and coastline. Do I have to choose? If so, I’ll choose the oceanside rocks below campsite 716 – perfect for watching seals at sunset.

Never miss what's going on.